Siberian Ginseng Boosts Energy Levels

Updated: Jul 3, 2019



A new age adapotgen used for over 2000 years to restore vitality, Siberian ginseng neutralises radiation, grants youth and is the intention behind the brand VALTALITY.



The term “adaptogen” was first introduced in 1947 by the Russian scientists investigating Siberian ginseng. Adaptogen stands for the plant’s ability to increase the body’s resistance to stress and enhance endurance. The interest to study Siberian ginseng was spiked by the scientists noticing that bears, dears and other animals frequently consumed the plant’s aerial parts, which later led to the plant being used in soviet solders, cosmonauts and sportsmen at the Olympic games to increase strength and resilience.


Eleutherococcus (Acanthopanax) senticosus, is a species of spiky woody shrub in the Araliaceae family native to Russia, Japan, Korea and North-eastern China. The plant goes under names of Siberian ginseng, eleuthero, ciwujia, Devil’s shrub, shigoka, touch-me-not, wild pepper and kan jang. It may be called ginseng but it does not belong to the Panax family, yet resembles close similarities in its actions, and is more affordable in comparison.


Known in Asia for over 2000 years it is used by the Traditional Chinese Medicine for Yang deficiency of the kidneys and the spleen, to enhance the appetite, alleviate fatigue, back pain and general weakness. Lee Shin Cheng, a medical practitioner during the Ming dynasty suggested Eleutherococcus for hernias, weak tendons and to slow ageing.


In Russia the plant is extensively used in people living in radiation zones, as the Chernobyl, because research proves Siberian ginseng is effective at eliminating radioactive toxins. For that reason it is also used in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, and has been approved by the Commission E, the German Pharmacology Regulatory Body as an adjunct treatment in cancer patients.


Siberian ginseng is a perennial plant with a powerful root system that smells like rose oil, and a fairly simple aerial growth with spiky stems, flowers and berries. The plant contains 7 eleutherosides, 5 of which were previously unknown to the world, but also pectin, coumarins, essential and plant oils, resin, and vitamins, particularly vitamin C and beta-carotene. At first only the roots were believed to have active constituents, yet it was later proven that leaves, stems, berries and flowers also possess powerful medicinal properties.


Eleutherococcus is a stimulant with accumulative effects that may take weeks to rise to necessary levels, thus several weeks of supplementation are followed by prolonged breaks. Overdosing may lead to insomnia, anxiety and hypertension.


Siberian ginseng benefits:

· Increases energy with lasting effects and fights fatigue and debility

· Enhances cognitive function

· Eliminates radioactive toxins

· Restores damaged nerve cells, and is currently investigated in the treatment of Alzheimer’s dis-ease

· Increases endurance and may be used in sports training

· Heals wounds and ulcers

· Increases bone density, as per 2013 study on mice, where 100mg of eleutherococcus per day for 8 weeks increased bone density to 16.7%

· Increases blood pressure

· Stimulates thyroid

· Assists with weight loss

· Enhances the immune system and thus alleviates respiratory infections such as pneumonia and flu

· Works on reproductive organs to regulate the cycle, increase libido and assist during menopause and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

· Used post infection and surgery to restore vitality

· Improves hearing and vision, alleviates early baldness

· Reduces irritability and nervousness associated with exhaustion

· Balances blood sugar levels by decreasing insulin resistance

· Counteracts the side effect of cortisone treatment, the decreased in size adrenal glands

· Prevents adrenalin rush

· Used in cosmetology as a restorative tonic to provide fresh and youthful look


Eleuthrococcus is safe for cooking, however precautions should be taken when consuming the plant for medicinal properties. The use must be avoided in those with known allergy to the plant, during menstruation, lactation, in children 12 years or younger, in cases of insomnia, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular abnormalities, during fever, acute infections, and stroke.


Always consult your health care practitioner prior to changing dietary routine.




References:


1. Милнер, К. (2015, October 6). Сибирский женьшень. Как повышали выносливость советских космонавтов. Retrieved from Epoch times: https://www.epochtimes.ru/sibirskij-zhenshen-kak-povyshali-vynoslivost-sovetskih-kosmonavtov-99005005/

2. Сорокин, А. (2017, August 5). Сибирский женьшень (Элеутерококк). Retrieved from Спорт и Здоровье: http://sportizdorovie.ru/zdorovoe-pitanie/sibirskij-zhenshen-eleuterokokk.html

3. Ahn J, U. M. (2013). Eleutheroside E, An Active Component of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice. Retrieved from Evidence Based Complimentary and Alternative Medicine: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23690865

4. Bespalov VG, A. V. (2012). [Comparative effects of difluoromethylornithine and tincture of Siberian ginseng root on radiation carcinogenesis and life span in rats]. Retrieved from Advances in Gernotology: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23130522

5. Bespalov VG1, A. V. (2014, December). Anticarcinogenic activity of alpha-difluoromethylornithine, ginseng, eleutherococcus, and leuzea on radiation-induced carcinogenesis in female rats. . Retrieved from International Journal of Radiation Biology: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24913295

6. Huang L, Z. H. (2011, February). Acanthopanax senticosus: review of botany, chemistry and pharmacology. Retrieved from Pharmazie: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21434569

7. Hwang YC, J. I. (2009). The effects of Acanthopanax senticosus extract on bone turnover and bone mineral density in Korean postmenopausal women. Retrieved from Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19452124

8. Kim CG, C.-A. V. (2018, March). Caspase-3/MAPK pathways as main regulators of the apoptotic effect of the phyto-mediated synthesized silver nanoparticle from dried stem of Eleutherococcus senticosus in human cancer cells. Retrieved from Biomedicine Pharmacotheraapy: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29331758

9. Lim DW, K. J. (2013, July 8). Preventive effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus bark extract in OVX-induced osteoporosis in rats. Retrieved from Molecules: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23884131

10. Meng Q, P. J. (2018, February). Anti-tumour effects of polysaccharide extracted from Acanthopanax senticosus and cell-mediated immunity. Retrieved from Eperimental and Theraputic Medicine: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29434755

11. Załuski D, K. R. (2018, March). HPTLC-profiling of eleutherosides, mechanism of antioxidative action of eleutheroside E1, the PAMPA test with LC/MS detection and the structure-activity relationship. Retrieved from Saudi Journal of Biological Science: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29692653

12. Zhou Y, C. C. (2018, January). Effects of Acanthopanax senticosus on Brain Injury Induced by Simulated Spatial Radiation in Mouse Model Based on Pharmacokinetics and Comparative Proteomics. Retrieved from International Journal of Molecular Science: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29342911

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